Boreal’s nucleic acid purification instruments are based on SCODA (Synchronous Coefficient of Drag Alteration) a novel, proprietary electrophoresis technology that selectively concentrates nucleic acids from large sample volumes to a small, concentrated amount of gel or buffer.

SCODA electrophoretic purification is fundamentally different from other extraction methods, with significant advantages:

  • Unparalleled nucleic acid purity from the most difficult samples.
  • High yield from dilute or trace samples, enabling recovery where all other methods fail.
  • Exceptional removal of all PCR inhibitors including humic substances, independent of species.
  • Minimal sample handling enabling a simplifed workflow.
  • Concentration and purification of high molecular weight DNA 50 kb – 1Mb.

 

How it works:

Purification and concentration is accomplished by means of rotating electric fields that act uniquely on long, charged polymers, leaving other molecules unaffected. The electric field parameters can be adjusted to select very specifically for nucleic acids, rejecting contaminants and PCR inhibitors that, in affinity-based purification methods, often co-elute with DNA and RNA.

This method allows for very simple nucleic acid purification on our Aurora system: a sample up to 5 mL in volume that has undergone one of our prescribed lysis protocols is added to an input chamber on the disposable cartridge adjacent to concentration gel. The cartridge is inserted into the instrument and, following automated injection and concentration, the purified product is recovered by pipetting a small volume of buffer from the central reservoir.

Demonstration of injection, then concentration of nucleic acids to the central buffer reservoir using Boreal’s SCODA electrophoretic purification technology.

 

The purification protocol can include electrophoretic washing – application of electric fields that remove contaminants and inhibitors from the gel while locking the DNA product in the center to increase contaminant removal from heavily inhibited samples.